What side of Cuba do you visit? The all-inclusive resorts and gorgeous beaches

View along sandy beach to Villa Dupont, Varadero, Cuba
 Holiday 
August 07, 2017 | 03:17 am / thesun.uk
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HOLIDAYS are full of choices – such as which sunbed to lay on and whether to drink a mojito or a piña colada. But Cuba throws up more options than most Caribbean islands.

Like its neighbours, it has the glitzy, all-inclusive resorts, where holidaymakers lounge on the beach and queue at all-you-can-eat buffets. Unlike them, it’s also a functioning Communist country, where the typical Comrade earns £19 a month.
So which side of Cuba do you choose to visit?

Previously, the capital of Havana was the obvious entry point into the country. From there it was a long schlep by bus — over two hours — along bumpy roads to a resort such as Varadero. But increasingly, airlines are flying direct to the resorts as well, making it easier to see both sides of the country.

Varadero is paradise, but it’s not the real Cuba. Sipping a neon blue cocktail by the pool as a conga line — the dance was invented in Cuba — snakes past, you could be anywhere in the Caribbean. The all-inclusive Iberostar Resort on the Varadero peninsula is a 5H hotel and one of the country’s best.

It’s on a beach with soft white sand, overlooking the Gulf of Mexico and the main pool has a swim-up bar and group activities, including limbo dancing.

The resort’s five restaurants include the Mediterranean-themed La Dorada, where you can have French toast and bacon cooked to order for breakfast. For children aged four to 12 there’s a kids’ club and family entertainment in the evening. But should you fancy some peace and quiet, the resort is more than big enough to escape the activities. In contrast to Varadero, Havana — 90 miles to the west — shows the real Cub

◼ Editorial / inStory.net
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